iOS Settings – I Mind Mapped Them All

I seem to be falling into a pattern. A pattern of obsessiveness of discovery. Who can forget the minute detail I went to in order to determine the size of the iPhone X screen? Or how about actually reading NIST Special Publication 800-63B in order to understand what the rules are about two-factor authentication and our banks? And then there’s documenting every minute change in the different MacBook Pro models to help you decide which one to buy. Or mapping all of the specs of the different iPhone models Apple is selling?

Well, I’ve done it again. I decided to mind map all, and I mean all of the Settings in iOS 11. I did not understand the utter madness into which I was about to descend when I undertook this project. But utter madness it was.

What’s the problem to be solved here? Personally, I find myself often digging around in Settings muttering to myself, “Where IS that setting? Was it in Mail, iCloud? Or was it in iCloud, Mail?”

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Tiny Tip – How to Add a Workout to Apple Health from iPhone by Sandy Foster

SandyThis Tiny, or possibly Nano tip came up when Sandy Foster asked in our Google Plus group at podfeet.com/googleplus how to add a workout from the iPhone. I responded that I didn’t think it was even possible, but luckily Allister Jenks stepped in and helped. Here’s Sandy’s Nano Tip:

Hi Allison. This is Sandy Foster with a quick tip, thanks to Allister’s help. I sometimes forget to start a workout on my Apple Watch before beginning. That’s usually because I’m with friends and we get talking. Oh well. I had a difficult time finding out how to manually add a workout, but here’s how it’s done.

Open the Health app on the iPhone. Go to the bottom of the page and tap on the second icon from the left; it’s the Health Data icon.

On the new page that opens, you will see four large colored squares. Tap on the one that says Activity, which will take you to a new page.

SandyScroll down a little to see “This Week” and — under that — “Exercise Minutes” and “Workouts”. Tap on Workouts. This takes you to yet another page.

This new page is the one I’d been searching for. In the top right-hand corner is a red plus sign. Tap on that.

Now just tap on the Activity Type field to get a selection of different workouts in a scrolling section at the bottom of the page; select the appropriate one. Then tap on the Starts and Ends sections in turn to set the date and time of the workout.

At the top of the page, tap Add, and you’re all done!


Allison interrupting again. Sandy and I chatted after she submitted this awesome tip because I couldn’t find Workouts below This Week. For some reason mine were above This Week. Workouts are hard to notice because they’re an orange button that looks like all the other buttons. I’m sure you’re more clever than me and can find them though.

I asked her the benefit of adding workouts in this manner, and she explained that this will give you credit in the Apple Activity app for time exercised and even calories if you have a good way to estimate what you burned.

Just Ask…Again

A little over a year ago I told you that if you want something to be different about podfeet.com or the podcast, you should go ahead and ask. I think this bears repeating, maybe once a year. It has come up just lately because a few people have made requests and I thought if I told you about their suggestions it might give you courage to ask. I want to emphasize that I will absolutely entertain all suggestions but I definitely don’t implement every request. Some I just don’t want to do, and some are too hard to do. But why not ask? Worst thing I can do is say no, right?

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CCATP #510 – Dr. Maryanne Garry on Many Memory Questions

DrThis week our guest is Dr. Maryanne Garry, a professor from the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Dr. Garry is a scientific researcher into memory, memory distortions, false memories, the myth of repression and its overlap with the law. This is her third appearance on Chit Chat Across the Pond, and has pretty much ruined everything we think we knew about memory.

Questions I asked Dr. Garry:

  • Do you look for things to study that have a specific problem to be solved? Secondarily – how are these projects funded?
  • What is a cognitive psychologist, and what other kind is there?
  • Can you explain the difference between autobiographical and semantic memories?
  • Why do we have some things that are easy to remember and others (like names and dates) that are more difficult to remember
  • Some medical procedures include a drug to make you forget. How do we know these memories of a horrible experience aren’t still there, buried? And couldn’t these memories be harmful?
  • Much of your work is about proving that you can implant false memories. Because you can do that, do we actually know that real repressed memories don’t exist?
  • How is it some adults can recall traumatic childhood memories with such vivid detail?
  • You’ve recently received a significant grant. Can you tell us about the new research?
  • Your research was published in the Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition about the concept of making America Great Again. This paper was cited in The Guardian. Can you tell us what you’ve learned?

Video of Dr. Garry’s talk “The End of Facts” at Claremont Graduate University. Thanks to Steve for capturing this.

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Dumb Question Corner – HEIF/HEVC in Photos

Listener (and good friend) Rally brings us our Dumb Question this week:

When MacOS High Sierra is installed, the photo and video formats are changed to HEIF and HEVF, respectively. I presume that means that the Photos library on the Mac is updated to this new format for all the pictures in the local library.
Is the iCloud Photos library also updated? If not, what happens when new HEIF photos are uploaded to the library?

I also have about 50 Photos libraries from our travels on my NAS device (i.e., they are not the system Photos library). How would they be managed under High Sierra when I use them in my videos?

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Tiny Tip – Starbucks App Confused by Face ID on iPhone X

StarbucksThis one might count as a nano-tip, but if you’ve got the problem this solves, it might be a mega tip for you.

One of the cool things about Face ID on iPhone X is that you don’t have to enable it for sites and apps that already used Touch ID. The API (Application Program Interface) just sees a biometric authenticator and doesn’t care if it’s your fingerprint or your face unlocking the phone.

However, Steve found that after bringing up the Starbucks app on his iPhone X, he could not open the app due to authentication issues with Face ID. When the Starbucks app requested his credentials, Face ID was activated as expected. The app would appear to accept Face ID for authentication, but then the app would freeze.

At first, Steve thought that the Starbucks app was not compatible with Face ID. It’s been really awesome how if you’re in line and you realize your balance is low, you could so quickly reload your card. There was no way Steve was going back to typing in his password every time he needed to reload his code.

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Tiny Tip – Safari’s Reader View

ReaderThe tip I’m going to give you today transformed my enjoyment of the Internet, both on iPhone and on Mac. Oddly I think it’s been around for a long time, but I think it’s been enhanced in recent versions of Safari. If you’ve already been using it, go ahead and say “I knew that!” But if you haven’t used it, you’re going to love this tip. Let’s start with a problem to be solved, shall we? Continue reading “Tiny Tip – Safari’s Reader View”

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Duolingo – Guest Post by Terry Vogelaar

DuolingoI am Terry Vogelaar from Holland and I would like to review Duolingo. The problem to be solved is that as the world turns into a global village, being able to speak more than one language becomes increasingly important, especially for people in the less wealthy countries. But traditional language education is expensive. So there is the desire to learn, but not the budget. That is where Duolingo comes in.

I wanted to learn Esperanto. Why Esperanto, you might ask? Because I’m a geek. This is a constructed language. It’s almost as straightforward as a programming language. It has no exceptions and the grammar is very visible. And it is a neutral middle ground. Whenever I speak English, I am well aware of my Dutch accent. I took a big step to learn English with all of its quirks. But I still feel inferior to native speakers, because I came to their territory. But with Esperanto, everyone took the same small step towards each other.

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NC #653 iOS Clean Install, iPhone X Second Look, Animoji Karaoke, Hue Motion Sensor, Security Bits

Possible replacement for Clarify (but maybe we don’t need it), a clean install tip for iOS from Joop Bruggink, a second look at iPhone X after a bit more time, my attempt at Animoji Karaoke, Denise Crown brings us her review of the Hue Motion Sensor. Then we have an installment of Security Bits with Bart Busschots.

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Security Bits – Canvas Fingerprinting, KRACK Updates, TOR Browser Bug, New Zero-Day WiFi Bug, Brother Printer Exploit

Security Medium 1 — Canvas Fingerprinting

Before we look at canvas finger printing, I just want to set the scene with a reminder of one of the most fundamental truths about how the web was designed – each web page load is an independent event. Because that meant websites had no memory of anything that went before, i.e. no concept of state the original web could not cope with concepts like logging in, or shopping baskets. Something had to be bolted on to allow web servers connect individual requests into related groups of requests.

The official mechanism added to the HTTP protocol for retaining state between requests is the humble cookie. Cookies gave us the ability to log in, and basically, the modern web. But, they came with a dark side — as well as enabling all the cool things we like about the modern web, they also enabled tracking.

Continue reading “Security Bits – Canvas Fingerprinting, KRACK Updates, TOR Browser Bug, New Zero-Day WiFi Bug, Brother Printer Exploit”

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