Open post
NosillaCast Logo

NC #620 Apple Watch Swimming, Standard Mac Apps, BrainPort Visualization Through the Tongue, eSight Low Vision Glasses, Non-tech Podcasts, GhostReader, BeatsX

Allister here standing in for Allison this week. I have a miniature review of using the Apple Watch Series 2 for swim workouts, I’ll quickly review 26 Mac Apps you didn’t know you already had, Allison will pop by with two more videos from the CSUN Assistive Technology Conference, I’ll make some recommendations for podcasts you might want to listen to that aren’t about technology, Terry delivers on his callout from Allison with a review of GhostReader text to speech software, and I’ll finish up with a review of the BeatsX Bluetooth earbuds with Apple W1 chip.


itunes
mp3 download
Continue reading “NC #620 Apple Watch Swimming, Standard Mac Apps, BrainPort Visualization Through the Tongue, eSight Low Vision Glasses, Non-tech Podcasts, GhostReader, BeatsX”

26 Mac Apps You Didn’t Know You Had

macOS Launchpad – Other folderOften when Allison puts out a call for material for the show, I’ll take a look at my installed Mac apps via Launchpad to see if there’s anything relatively new that’s worth a review. Faced with the prospect of sourcing an entire show, I did the same thing, but what I noticed was not something new. In fact, it’s a whole lot of somethings and they’re all quite old.

There’s a folder on the default Launchpad configuration called “Other” which contains all 17 applications from the Utility folder that lives inside your Applications folder, plus 9 other applications that aren’t usually featured in Apple promotional materials.

I thought it might be useful to listeners if I quickly ran through what’s in there and maybe you’ll discover something useful you didn’t know you had. Continue reading “26 Mac Apps You Didn’t Know You Had”

Guest Review of the Tucano Elements Second Skin for MacBook 12″ by Allister

Greetings Allison and fellow NosillaCastaways. Allister here from New Zealand with a quick review of a product that won’t excite many, but will help prevent moments of horror.

Tucano MacBook sleeveThe problem to be solved is keeping my gorgeous gold 12″ MacBook looking gorgeous. I bought the laptop while travelling and so quickly became aware of just how easily it marked even carefully putting it in its own pocket in my work-provided laptop backpack. It clearly needed its own special protection.
Continue reading “Guest Review of the Tucano Elements Second Skin for MacBook 12″ by Allister”

OmniFocus 2 Might Help You Get Things Done

Omnifocus home screen showing different views of projectsHello Allison and the NosillaCastaways, Allister here from New Zealand again with a review of an application I’ve known about for years but only just grokked. Let me start by reading you a list.

To Do (two words), myTo-Dos, iProcrastinate, OmniFocus for iPhone, ToDo (one word), Remember The Milk, To Do Exchange Tasks, Any.do, Things, Due, and Todoist. That’s the list of task management, or “to-do” apps I had tried on my iPhone up until recently. Some of those apps are, or were, quite good. But I don’t use any of them any more. Many had interesting or useful features, some were delightful to use and some were effective task managers. The trouble with all of them was the same – me. I’m not so great at task management and I found in most cases I was not drawn to using them, even though I needed them.

In recent months I have been listening to some new podcasts and I have heard some very busy people swear by one particular task management app. They each said the only way that they could get as much done as they do, was because of this app. Then some of them started talking about why this app helps them so much. It sounded both simple and powerful. I also know several other podcasters who have long talked about this same app with reverence. So I began to look at it closely. Continue reading “OmniFocus 2 Might Help You Get Things Done”

Store and Secure Your MagSafe 2 Adapter with MagCozy

$10 part at store.apple.comRemember what Tim Verpoorten used to say, that he liked little apps that did one thing and did them well? I’ve got a piece of hardware that does one thing and does it well. It might be a misnomer to call it hardware though, since it’s soft and squishy. But wait, what’s the problem to be solved? You have a relatively new MacBook Pro, so you have the generation 2 version of the MagSafe connector. When you had your old MacBook Pro, you knew the battery didn’t last very long so you invested in one or more extra chargers. Apple in their supreme wisdom changed the size of the MagSafe connector. I’m sure they had a good technical reason and that they didn’t intentionally just change it to make us buy an adapter, right? At least in this case they only charge $10 for it instead of the what is it, $20? $30? they charge for a 30 pin to 9 pin adapter.

MagCozy in bright red!Ok, we have a baseline, you have the old charger, and you can stick that new magsafe adapter on it (all by magnets) and it’s all great, right? But now you go on travel and it gets knocked off. Or maybe you carry a spare adapter just in case you’re out and you can only find someone with an old charger, or you share your power supply with someone who has Magsafe 1, the chance are SUPER high that you’re going to lose this little gem. Buying it twice is the only thing more annoying than buying it once.

Enter the MagCozy. It’s a little rubber thingy that holds onto your Magsafe adapter. You stretch one end over the connector from the power supply, and you stretch the other end to encapsulate your magsafe adapter. From now on you can take the adapter on and off and your Magsafe adapter will stay with the power supply and greatly reduce the chances that you’ll lose it. I have two of these adapters, one for my Apple Cinema Display, and one for my downstairs power supply by the couch, so Steve got me the bright red MagCozys – a two pack for $10 at Amazon. You can get them in clear, black, green, orange, pink, white, dark blue or even glow in the dark! I told you, it does one thing and does it well!

How To Set Up a VPN Server Using a Mac

These instructions may seem arcane and complex but they’re really easy if you just follow along step by step. Donald Burr of Otaku No Podcast (otakunopodcast.com) created all of these instructions in text form, Allison just created the ScreenSteps tutorial!

I’ll be focusing on using a Mac on your home network using an Airport Extreme Router (of course any router will work but the screenshots will be for the Airport). If you have a router capable of installing the Tomato Router Firmware, you should look at Donald’s full instructions because you may not need to use a Mac at all for this, your router can do it all. See Donald’s notes for other options.

Read Donald’s instructions ===> here.

If you’d rather download this manual for easy off line reference, click here.

If you’ve installed the VPN Server but would like to UNinstall it, click here for instructions.
If you can connect to your VPN server but can’t get outside your network, click here.

Let’s get started already!

SECTION 1 – Setting Up a Static IP for the Server on the LAN Side

These instructions should be completed on the machine that will become the VPN server.

Open Network Preferences

wpid4031-media_1365280662765.png

Select Advanced

wpid4032-media_1365280675209.png

Copy the Mac Address

wpid4033-media_1365280721095.png

Open AirPort Utility

wpid4028-media_1365280516371.png

Click on your router, in my case it’s called White Dart.

Select Enter Router Password

wpid4029-media_1365280554220.png

Enter your password when prompted and click OK.

Select Edit

wpid4030-media_1365280584891.png

Select the Network Tab and Click the + Button

wpid4034-media_1365280882600.png

Paste in the Mac Address You Copied Earlier

wpid4035-media_1365280918919.png

Select Update

wpid4036-media_1365280952190.png

Select Continue

wpid4037-media_1365280961141.png

Quit Airport Utility when this operation completes.

SECTION 2 – Creating Account at No-IP.com

wpid4038-media_1365281321183.png

Navigate to http://www.noip.com and select Sign Up.

Create a Username and Password

wpid4039-media_1365281419227.png

Enter your Email address. Note the host name shown which is free, but if you want to pay you can get more options. Scroll down to the bottom of the page.

Select Sign Up

wpid4040-media_1365281428527.png

Email Confirmation Will be Sent

wpid4041-media_1365281518624.png

Click the Link in the Email

wpid4042-media_1365281542237.png

Download the Update Client

wpid4043-media_1365281570364.png

This client will run in the background and check to see if your IP address has changed, and if it has, will send it to no-ip.com

Download and Install the Client

wpid4044-media_1365282117739.png

Enter Your No-iP.com Account Info You Just Created

wpid4045-media_1365282485030.png

This menu should pop up automatically.

Click OK

wpid4046-media_1365282491538.png

Click on Hosts and Check the Box Next to the Host Name You Chose

wpid4047-media_1365282517357.png

It may take a few moments for the host name you selected at no-ip.com to show up. Make sure you note this name, you’ll need it later.

Select Update Now

wpid4048-media_1365282533083.png

Turn on the Daemon

wpid4049-media_1365282588526.png

I chose this rather than running the application in the background all the time.

SECTION 3 – Installing Xcode and Running Command Line Tools

Find Xcode in the Mac App Store

Install Xcode

wpid4050-media_1365282711107.png

Install Java

wpid4051-media_1365284749241.png

Xcode only installs the standalone Java, and it does NOT include the Java Web plugin that has been the subject of so many security vulnerabilities lately.

Select Install Next to Command Line Tools

wpid4052-media_1365285864062.png

Wait till the installation finishes and quit X-Code

Type xcodebuild -license to Open the License Agreement

wpid4053-media_1365287350119.png

Start Hitting the Space Bar to Scroll Through the EULA – A LOT of Times

wpid4054-media_1365287366580.png

Type Agree

wpid4055-media_1365287392448.png

Type agree

Joy of Agreement

wpid4056-media_1365287403891.png

SECTION 4 – Installing MacPorts

wpid4057-media_1365287788717.png

Navigate to https://distfiles.macports.org/MacPorts/ and scroll to the bottom to download the installer file for your OS.

Install MacPorts

wpid4058-media_1365288008992.png

Enter These Commands in the Terminal

wpid4059-media_1365288274692.png

To run the self update to Macports enter:

  source ~/.profile
then
  sudo port -v selfupdate

and enter your administrator password

Success

wpid4060-media_1365288401688.png

Open the VPN Software

wpid4061-media_1365288464077.png

Enter

  sudo port -v install openvpn2

and watch a lot of glop go by…

SECTION 5 – Installing Tuntap Drivers

wpid4062-media_1365288693615.png

Open the Package File (in the folder after tuntap expands)

wpid4063-media_1365288872704.png

Gatekeeper won’t let you just double click on the installer package (it will complain that it is from an unknown source), you have to right click on the installer package and choose “open”.

SECTION 6 – Donald’s Nifty Scripts of Doom

Download Donald’s scripts from: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/169813/openvpn-mac.tar.bz2

Type These Commands to Unarchive the Scripts

wpid4064-media_1365289258876.png

cd ~/Downloads
tar xvjf openvpn-mac.tar.bz2

Setting Up OpenVPN Server

wpid4065-media_1365290046566.png

We’re now going to run Donald’s scripts. Enter this command:

  cd openvpn-mac && sudo bash setup-openvpn-server

Name your Server (I’ve entered kyles-mac-vpn)
Enter the dynamic dns host name you noted back on no-ip.com (you DID note it, right?)

Keep Answering Questions

wpid4066-media_1365290326768.png

The first time through you need to answer these. These steps will be duplicated MANY times, but after this the answers will be there and you can simply hit Enter for each questions.

Hit Enter for All These Questions for an RSA Key

wpid4068-media_1365290494060.png

And Again for Some Reason

wpid4067-media_1365290461185.png

Keep Answering…

wpid4069-media_1365290595513.png

And Again

wpid4070-media_1365290809777.png

And Again…

wpid4071-media_1365290886144.png

Whew!

wpid4072-media_1365290948754.png

Enter passphrase and password as many times as they ask for it!

Finder Window Opens Showing config-files

wpid4073-media_1365291120916.png

Copy this file to Dropbox. It will be the first connection file you test. It would be good to name it something associated with the device on which you’ll use it (you’ll be creating one of these for each of your devices).

Create a New VPN Connection Document for Each Device You Have

In Terminal, enter:

  sudo setup-openvpn-client connection-name

where connection-name means something to you for each different device you’ll want to connect to the VPN server. Move each of these files to Dropbox to be picked up on your devices.

SECTION 7 – Opening up UDP Port 1194

wpid4074-media_1365291286486.png

Open Airport Utility again, select your Airport again, Select Edit again. Select the Network tab, and select the + under Port Settings

Enter Information As Shown

wpid4075-media_1365291365335.png

Select Update

wpid4076-media_1365291371431.png

Wait until your Airport updates.

SECTION 8 – Install VPN Software on iOS

wpid4021-IMG_5127.png

Download OpenVPN Connect from the iTunes App Store.

Open Dropbox

wpid4022-IMG_5128.png

Find the file you created and moved into Dropbox and tap on it.

Select the Open In Button in the Bottom Right

wpid4023-IMG_5129.png

Select Open in OpenVPN

wpid4024-IMG_5130.png

Click the Green Plus Button to Import the File

wpid4025-IMG_5131.png

Enter the Password

wpid4026-IMG_5133.png

Enter the Password you created in the creation of the file, and tap the Save switch to turn it on. Finally tap the Off Switch to Connect to the VPN.

Connected!

wpid4027-IMG_5134.png

SECTION 9 – Install VPN Software on OSX

wpid4077-media_1365292563757.png

Two options for a VPN application on the Mac. Donald recommended Viscosity from http://www.sparklabs.com/viscosity/download/ which is $9 per Mac.

After the show Dr. Matt suggested the free TunnelBlick from http://code.google.com/p/tunnelblick. I installed both and they both work well. This tutorial will be for Viscosity, but if you try Tunnelblick you have to do one thing to make it work. In the Settings, Configuration tab, select Advanced and then uncheck the box to use TunnelBlick’s tun/tap drivers.

Let’s keep going with Viscosity as our example.

Install Viscosity

wpid4078-media_1365292763152.png

Click on the icon for Viscosity in the menubar and choose Preferences.

In the Connection Tab Click on the Plus Button at the Bottom

wpid4079-media_1365292787379.png

Select Import Connection From File…

wpid4080-media_1365292806653.png

Navigate to the File You Created for This Device

wpid4081-media_1365292836675.png

In my case I called it alsmac so I could tell which one to open

Connection Imported

wpid4082-media_1365292845976.png

Connect Using Menu Bar App

wpid4083-media_1365293050152.png

Enter the Password You Created

wpid4084-media_1365293071771.png

No clue which one of the 198 I entered, luckily I typed the same one over and over again.

Fleeting Notification of Connection

wpid4086-media_1365293260928.png

To test mine at home I used a Mifi so I was on a different network.

Use the Menubar Icon to Disconnect When You’re Through

wpid4085-media_1365293105700.png

If you want to prove to yourself that you’re on VPN – go to http://ipchicken.com before and after you VPN and you’ll find that your IP changes to your home IP. Congratulations!

#357 Kernel Panics, Quicken for Lion, My Talk Tools, Capti, FlyGrip, Home Networking

We had a kernel panic during the live show last week, and four tech mavens helped me figure out what caused it, George from Tulsa tells us about the new Quicken for Lion: Lion Compatible Quicken FAQ, Import Quicken Essentials Data into Quicken, Buy Lion Compatible Quicken from Intuit for $14.99. Two more reviews from the CSUN Persons With Disabilities Expo, My Talk Tools from mytalktools.com and Charm Tech Capti for a more accessible and enjoyable access to Firefox. Professor asks if there isn’t some way to protect his PowerPC Macs. FlyGrip iPhone and Android accessory from flygrip.com. In Chit Chat Across the Pond Bart goes on a rant about 3rd party cookies, and then gives us the higher division course on home networking, and the advantages of building your own network router.


Continue reading “#357 Kernel Panics, Quicken for Lion, My Talk Tools, Capti, FlyGrip, Home Networking”

#340 Plantronics Voyager Pro HD, Ollocip, Kindle Fire Review, Aperture Script, Ray Solar Charger, BlackBerry Bold 9930

NosillaCastaways are smarter than the Apple geniuses, Plantronics Voyager Pro HD Review from Rod Simmons (Plantronics Voyager Pro HD), Olloclip review from Rod (Olloclip). Kindle Fire review (amazon.com. Tom Stewart sends in his first review – explaining how to use an Aperture Script from ApertureExpert.com to swap out RAW images for JPEGs.Ray Solar Charger review by Rod Simmons from quirky.com. BlackBerry Bold 9930 Review, and Robb Dunewood of Simple Mobile Review Podcast joins us to talk about the past, present and future of Research in Motion.

itunes
Continue reading “#340 Plantronics Voyager Pro HD, Ollocip, Kindle Fire Review, Aperture Script, Ray Solar Charger, BlackBerry Bold 9930”

#338 Time Machine, Blindfolded, Photography and the Mac, Quit All Apps, 3 in 1 Camera Lens, Apple Sandboxing

Time Machine review, Blindfolded accessibility update, Photography and the Mac Podcast Promo find it in iTunes. In Dumb Question Corner Professor Albert joins us again asking how to quit all running applications and gets a surprising answer. 3 in 1 Camera Lens review from Rod Simmons. George from Tulsa says some nice things about Podfeet.com and explains that you have to turn off Ad Block to see my Amazon Affiliate link, and then throws down the gauntlet about a lively discussion he and Bart had about Apple’s move towards Sandboxing. Bart comes back with a full Chit Chat Across the Pond explaining Sandboxing and why it’s a good, not scary thing.

itunes
Continue reading “#338 Time Machine, Blindfolded, Photography and the Mac, Quit All Apps, 3 in 1 Camera Lens, Apple Sandboxing”

#199 WD Ethernet Drive, Nambu, Blue Icicle

High anticipation for show #200 next week, Dumb Question Corner on having multiple people in a single chat, George from Tulsa gives us a less than favorable review of the Western Digital Ethernet Drive. I review the new beta Twitter client Nambu from nambu.com. Screen Steps has a great webinar at bluemangolearning.com. I review the Blue Icicle XLR to USB interface from bluemic.com. In Chit Chat Across the Pond Bar and I talk about why Windows machines are so much cheaper and all of the things I actually like about Windows.

itunes

Listen to the Podcast Once (53 min)
Continue reading “#199 WD Ethernet Drive, Nambu, Blue Icicle”

Posts navigation

1 2
Scroll to top