Open post
NosillaCast Logo

NC #651 iPhone X Ordering, Sennheiser Headphones, Olympus & Monoprice Tracking, Security Bits

Failure to order two iPhone X’s but at least Steve is getting one. Helma from the Netherlands reviews the Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones. Both Olympus and Monoprice are forcing third-party cookie tracking on you when you’re buying from them. Bart Busschots brings us another edition of Security Bits where he talks about insecure child smart watches, how the IRS isn’t worried about the Equifax breach, a macro-less remote code execution problem in Microsoft Office, and how Eltima was hacked. He also tells us how several of the week’s “big” security news stories are not actually stories at all.

mp3 download

Continue reading “NC #651 iPhone X Ordering, Sennheiser Headphones, Olympus & Monoprice Tracking, Security Bits”

Open post
no cookies

Vote With Your Dollars – Monoprice Also Using Third-Party Tracking with Criteo

On October 24th I wrote a blog post about how Olympus (the camera makers) were using third-party cookie tracking using a service from Criteo. I was appalled that a site dedicated to letting me buy their products would use such a service. It wasn’t just that they wanted us to be tracked, it’s that this Criteo tracker pops up a banner saying that if you click any link on the page, you have agreed to be tracked. So there’s no way around it.

Criteo tracker monopriceAfter I posted the article about Olympus and tracker company Criteo, Bruce Tyrell in our Facebook group (podfeet.com/facebook) alerted me to the fact that Monoprice is also doing this with ad tracker Criteo. If you’re not familiar with Monoprice, they sell electronics at very low prices, specifically known for inexpensive cables.

Continue reading “Vote With Your Dollars – Monoprice Also Using Third-Party Tracking with Criteo”

Open post
no cookies

Olympus Forcing Users to Agree to Third-Party Cookie Ad Tracker

If I didn’t have the screenshots to prove it, you’d think I was making this story up. Olympus, the camera manufacturer, is blocking their own content unless you allow third-party ad tracking from a company called Criteo.

I first discovered this when I used my iPhone to getolympus.com with the intent of comparing the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II to the E-M10 Mark III.

With iOS 11 and High Sierra from Apple, third-party cookie tracking is blocked by default. It doesn’t stop ads, it just keeps companies with whom you have no relationship from collecting your browsing history as you move around the Internet. Continue reading “Olympus Forcing Users to Agree to Third-Party Cookie Ad Tracker”

Security Bits – 30 September 2017

From Allison: I’ve just decided that it might be a nice enhancement to the podcast and blog if you could see Security Bits as a stand-alone blog post. Makes it easier to find and more importantly easier to reference when sharing with others. Bart will be shown as the author (since he IS the author) but I’ll write the excerpt for each post.

In this week’s action-packed Security Bits, Bart brings some follow-up on the Equifax breach and more details about Apple’s Face ID. We have three security mediums this week. We cover the CCleaner compromise which infected over 2 million machines. Then we talk about the macOS Keychain vulnerability that was announced this week for macOS (something for everyone). In the third “medium” Bart explains cookies from inception and why they’re needed, through their evolution to help us into something that can track us. He walks us through all of this so we can understand how the changes Apple made in Safari 11 are reducing the tracking and why it’s making some types of advertisers cranky at Apple. Finally, Bart goes through Notable Security Updates, Notable News, Suggested Reading and has a couple of nice palette cleansers. Continue reading “Security Bits – 30 September 2017”

Scroll to top