Open post
tiny tip logo

Tiny Tip – Home Button Can Sleep Apple TV and TV/Receiver

Apple TV remote showing home buttonApple TV Sleep Now

A few weeks ago I was listening to the Clockwise Podcast and Mikah Sargent briefly mentioned something about the sleep button on the Apple TV remote. I couldn’t get it out of my head wondering what he was talking about. I figured out that what he’d mentioned was actually something pretty amazing.

If you hold down the TV/Home button for a full second on the Siri remote (the black one that comes with more recent models of Apple TV, it will pop up on screen an option to put the Apple TV to sleep. That’s not the cool part.

Clicking on this sleep option will also turn off any connected devices. In our house, this sleep option turns off our big TV and the audio/visual receiver to which it’s connected! I tested it on a different TV with a different A/V receiver and it worked there too. I can’t swear this will work for your setup but give it a try.

We watch most things on our Apple TV these days so it’s an absolute delight to be able to shut down all of our components with the little remote that’s already in my hand.

Open post
Dumb Question Corner logo

Dumb Question Corner – What’s the Difference Between an Amp and a Receiver?

Gen 4 Apple TVListener Jill sent in a great dumb question this week, and Allison decided that I was more qualified to answer. Here’s Jill’s question:

What is a “receiver”?

The reason for my question is, Apple told us at WWDC that the 4th gen Apple TV could be used as a destination for Airplay 2 (multi-room audio). But the 4th gen Apple TV has no audio out, so how can that work? I don’t want my TV screen lighting up every time I want to play a podcast! Well, I asked around, and I got told “You need a receiver that offers HDMI connections”. Hence my question. So … what is a “receiver”? Also, supplementary question – why is it called a “receiver”? I have a good old fashioned amp, because I’m nearly as old as you are. I get amps: sound sources go in; you choose one, adjust the volume, job done. You can’t buy them any more – just these receiver things, and since I never got on that train, I haven’t a clue where to start asking about them.

Good question, Jill. You actually pose a couple questions. The first is “What is a receiver and why is it called a receiver?” and the second (implied) question is “How do you play audio from a gen 4 Apple TV?”

Let’s start with what is a receiver and why is it called a receiver. There are several types of receivers but the relevant ones for this discussion are an audio receiver and an A/V (audio/video) receiver.

Continue reading “Dumb Question Corner – What’s the Difference Between an Amp and a Receiver?”

Scroll to top