Open post
hello (again) on iPhone X

iPhone X Second Look

Last week I gave you Steve and my first impressions of the iPhone X and I promised to give you more observations after using it for a bit longer.

Face ID is the flashy new feature, so let’s start there. Steve and I like it more and more as we use it. When you first get the phone, it’s natural to lift the phone (wake on raise needs to be enabled) and then stare at the camera until you see the little lock unlock on screen, and then swipe up to get to the home screen. This is just slightly faster than using Touch ID.

But after a little bit of use, you realize that the unlocking of the lock is merely an animation and there’s no need to wait for it. Pretty soon you get into the easy habit of lifting the phone and swiping up because the Face ID has already noticed you’re looking at it and unlocked. It’s way way faster than Touch ID.

For the Over 40 Crowd

Portrait
Polarization was a problem before the iPhone X

I have a couple of big things I like with iPhone X for the over 40 crowd. Being over 40 gives you a good chance of needing reading glasses. I went for progressive lenses (modern bifocals) across the board a while ago so I could read but still look out at a distance, all without taking on and off my glasses. I even had progressive lenses put in my sunglasses.

But with iPhone and I presume other phones, the polarization was a problem. If my iPhone 7 Plus was in portrait, the screen would be so dark with sunglasses that I had trouble reading it. I’d turn the phone sideways, hoping to embiggen the text and have the polarization reversed so it was brighter. Sadly the iPhone 7 Plus had that supposedly nifty split-screen adding a sidebar in landscape in apps like Mail. So then I’d have to hit another button just to get rid of it.

But here’s the awesome part about the iPhone X. It’s got circular polarization so no matter what way I rotate it, I can still see it with my sunglasses! And, because it’s a smaller form factor, delightfully the iPhone X does not have a sidebar added when going into landscape mode. Before this, I always had to take my sunglasses off, switch to my normal clear glasses and back.

Speaking of sunglasses, the first time I tried Face ID with them on, it failed. I immediately typed in my long, complex password, and the next time I tried Face ID with the sunglasses on, it worked immediately and has ever since. The fact that it learns without you actively teaching it is awesome!

Portrait
Contour Lighting Makes Me Look Less of a Trainwreck

Still with the over 40 crowd, contour lighting on the iPhone X and iPhone 8 cameras is a girl’s best friend. I took a selfie after helping Lindsay and Nolan and Forbes move into their new house. I looked like a train wreck, and the lighting was unflattering. But I flipped it over to contour lighting and the wrinkles were mostly gone in my face! It’s still not the best image of me but I can only imagine how great it will do when I’m not exhausted.

I should mention that this mode is on a little carousel while you’re taking the photo, but you can actually play with that carousel and choose different lighting after you take the image. Pretty amazing. In that carousel are a few other effects, like studio lighting and stage lighting which are pretty fun. Oh, and these effects are available now on both the front and back cameras. I’m not sure if this is why but I suspect the back camera can do it because it has two lenses for parallax, and the front camera can do it because it has depth sensing from the Face ID sensors. In any case, cool effects.

Annoyances

Lest you think it’s all joy and wonder, let’s talk about a few things that annoy us. Last week I explained that while swiping up from the bottom gesture bar to get to the home screen is perfectly intuitive, it was harder and less intuitive to get to the app switcher card view with a partial swipe up and hold. Neither Steve nor I have gotten used to this gesture, even another week later.

The main reason I use the app switcher is to change to the most recent app. I rarely want to go flipping back 5 or 10 apps ago. Luckily to get to the most recent app, you simply swipe from left to right on the gesture bar. It’s a very easy gesture and I’m getting used to it.

I complained last week about how it was even less intuitive to quit apps from the app switcher. You have to press and hold on a card until all of them gets a red circle on them. Then you can swipe up on any card you can see, or hit the red circle on one. I was hoping to tell you by now that Steve and I were masters of this gesture sequence, but I’m sad to report that we both still hate it.

My process is to swipe up too far and end up at the home screen, then open some random app, then carefully swipe partway and hold to get to the app switcher, then to press and hold but nothing happens, change which app to press and hold on, then finally swipe up but accidentally quit the wrong app.

René Ritchie on MacBreak Weekly said he asked Apple why they made it harder to quit an app and they told him because they don’t want people doing it! I guess I understand that, for the people who in an OCD-like frenzy are always quitting all of their apps. But there are lots of other times you have to be able to quit an app. How about when the App Store misbehaves and can’t find anything in search and you have to quit and restart it? Or how about when Facebook comes up blank and never resolves? Or how about when you want to check a path in Waze, but once you see the path you don’t want your battery chewed up so you want it to stop? There are lots and lots of reasons we have to quit apps.

This one isn’t an annoyance, but more of a surprise. Remember the extensive geometry I did to prove that the iPhone X screen is only 1% smaller than the iPhones Plus? Well, what I didn’t realize was that the narrowness of the iPhone X actually makes lots of things much smaller. I noticed this when peering carefully at the same image on my iPhone 7 Plus vs. the X to see if I could tell that the OLED screen is better (still can’t tell). I got out a ruler and measured the size of the image when displayed on the two phones. Images taken on iPhone are 9.1cm x 6.9cm on the Plus-sized phone, but only 8.3cm x 6.2cm on the iPhone X. That makes the Plus-sized image actually 23% bigger, which is not insignificant.

Surprisingly I’m not missing the big size, and I really liked having a big phone. I’m not sure why this is. Perhaps the clarity of the screen really does make a difference or the fact that I can see it in sunlight with my sunglasses on. It’s hard to tell.

AccessibilityHere’s an annoyance. I tried to play around with VoiceOver on iPhone X. The first thing I tried to do was go to the home screen from inside an app. I moved my finger around till I heard a bonking noise when I was on the gesture bar, and then swept way up on screen, but it took me to the app switcher instead of going to the home screen. I tried this probably 20 times and only got to the home screen twice.

I tweeted about this and Allison Hartley from the Tech Doctor Podcast came to my aid. We chatted back and forth on direct messages on Twitter but I still couldn’t get it to work. She generously offered to get on a Skype call so she could demonstrate for me on video. Funny that a blind person would think of that, isn’t it?

Well anyway, as we worked together, she helped me figure out a couple of things. The gesture bar, if your finger is in the right place, doesn’t make a bonking sound, it’s more of a boop, or perhaps a bloop. She explained that the bonking sound is VoiceOver’s way of telling you that you’re in a spot where it can’t identify anything at all. She said that the gesture bar is really very far down at the very bottom. Once I got down far enough, I heard the bloop instead of the bonk.

But when I swiped way up on the screen, I still got the darn app switcher. We went back and forth for quite a while until I realized that the sighted and blind gestures are reversed! For the sightlings, we have to swipe way up to get to home, and only partially up to get to the app switcher. For VoiceOver users, it’s the opposite. Way up is the app switcher and partially up (maybe 1/3) gets you to the home screen. Why on earth Apple reversed those, I’ll never know.

I showed Steve how with VoiceOver the blind have a much easier way of quitting apps. Once you get to the app switcher with VoiceOver, you only have to swipe up with three fingers to quit an app. He said, “I want that!!!” And I agree with him.

By the way, we’re going to get Allison on Chit Chat Across the Pond during December. She’s got a rant planned about the phrase “it just works” because she says she had a bear of a time setting up her iPhone X. Should be a fun time, Allison is awesome. Plus, it’s fun to say Allison is awesome!

I have a love/hate relationship with Control Center on iPhone X. I really prefer sliding down on the upper right ear than sliding up from the bottom of the screen on the home-button phones. With slide up from the bottom, I could never get into Control Center if I was in an app that had a text entry field open because it would get confused. With it in the upper right, it’s 100% reliable for me.

I say hate though because I hate that I have to go to it more often. What’s my battery percentage? Control Center required. Did my VPN come on at Starbucks like it should? Into Control Center to find out because there’s not enough room on the screen. It does briefly show right when it kicks in but if you miss it you’re back to Control Center.

I do really love having the disconnect from WiFi button in Control Center though. As much as I whined that it didn’t turn off WiFi like it seemed it was doing, so many times I’m on dodgy WiFi so my VPN isn’t quite connecting and I’d really just like to get to cellular data to get something done. Or this case, as I leave the house to go to the gym, I always send Dorothy a Glympse so she knows when to expect us. It was always hard to do right as we left because my WiFi would stick to the house for a half a block. No longer a problem, tap that button and I’m good to go. Ok, that had nothing to do with Control Center, but I like it.

I’ve run into a couple of little bugs on iPhone X. Nothing serious but they were interesting to me. One day notifications were on both ears, so I had no access to Control Center. A reboot sorted it, but it was a curiosity. I’ve also been trying to join the Animoji Karaoke funfest invented by Harry McCracken. Animoji can only be 10 seconds long if you use the recorder inside Messages. But Harry figured out you could use the screen recording feature built into iOS to capture as long as you want. You have to use an editor to crop it down though because otherwise, it’s a full Messages thread.

Then Harry got the idea to lip sync a song with one character and then another and make a duet. He did Sonny and Cher singing “I Got You, Babe” and it’s absolutely hilarious. People have really gotten creative with this. Just search the hashtag #AnimojiKaraoke and you’ll lose an afternoon laughing!

Anyway, this was supposed to be about bugs, not about how amazingly fun Animoji are. By the way, I’ve started using Animoji for all of my iMessage conversations. The problem I’m having is that my phone wouldn’t regularly record the screen. It would start and stop and was super inconsistent. I could restart the phone and it would work once, but if I made a karaoke misstep I’d have to restart the phone. I’m going to spend some more quality time diagnosing this problem because it’s critical that I get in on the phone. I have an AWESOME idea that I don’t think has been done yet!

Overall Impressions

I was on the SMR Podcast this week and they were asking me about the phone because Chris Ashley is considering it. I realized as I described the phone that it is a truly NEW phone. The iPhone 7 Plus was awesome because it was huge and had a way better camera than my iPhone 6, but it really felt like a new version of a phone I already had. iPhone X feels like a new phone. I love it, I want to play with it all the time. In fact, I gotta get going, that Anomji Karaoke isn’t going to record itself!

Open post
no cookies

Olympus Forcing Users to Agree to Third-Party Cookie Ad Tracker

If I didn’t have the screenshots to prove it, you’d think I was making this story up. Olympus, the camera manufacturer, is blocking their own content unless you allow third-party ad tracking from a company called Criteo.

I first discovered this when I used my iPhone to getolympus.com with the intent of comparing the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II to the E-M10 Mark III.

With iOS 11 and High Sierra from Apple, third-party cookie tracking is blocked by default. It doesn’t stop ads, it just keeps companies with whom you have no relationship from collecting your browsing history as you move around the Internet. Continue reading “Olympus Forcing Users to Agree to Third-Party Cookie Ad Tracker”

Open post
diamond ring on total eclipse

How Do You Capture a Total Eclipse … and Still Experience It?

Allison Steve stare at the sunYou might have heard that a total eclipse of the sun traveled across the United States on Monday the 21st of August. Steve and I were lucky enough to witness it as our second total solar eclipse.

I want to tell you about it, so I have to come up with a tech angle to do that or it’s against some rule of mine. The question I’d like to answer is, “How do you capture a total solar eclipse?”

My first answer is, don’t try. Seriously. Continue reading “How Do You Capture a Total Eclipse … and Still Experience It?”

Open post
NosillaCast Logo

NC #630 PowerBeats3 vs Jabra Sport Headphones, Yi 4K+ Action Camera, Sleep Tracking is Dumb, Anker USB Charger, Ikea Smart Lighting, Plantronics Headset, Is it Safe to Click a Link?

Steve Sheridan compares two Bluetooth headphones, the new PowerBeats 3 against the older Jabra Sports, not as much on sound quality but on fit and Bluetooth connectivity. We’ve got our last interview from NAB 2017, with Yi about their 4K+ Action Camera (the guy called it a GoPro killler). I’ll tell you why I think sleep tracking is dumb and Bart will tell you how an Anker 2 port USB charger solved his problem. Joe Dugandzic of Smarter Home Life will tell us about the new offerings from Ikea in affordable smart lighting. Bruce Wilson tells us about the Plantronics Blackwire C435 headset he used for our interview on Chit Chat Across the Pond this week. We’ll finish up with two dumb questions from me to Bart about clicking unsubscribe links in emails and shortened links in Twitter. I learned something new from his answer.


mp3 download

Continue reading “NC #630 PowerBeats3 vs Jabra Sport Headphones, Yi 4K+ Action Camera, Sleep Tracking is Dumb, Anker USB Charger, Ikea Smart Lighting, Plantronics Headset, Is it Safe to Click a Link?”

Open post

Watch Bad Guys (and Coyotes) with the Ring Floodlight Cam

Ring floodlight cam day viewWe live in a pretty safe neighborhood, but we like to keep an eye on things around our house. As safe as the neighborhood is, we do know of cases where deliveries have been stolen from front doorsteps from time to time. You’ve probably heard about the Ring Video Doorbell that we reviewed last January. It’s great to watch our front door with a live view or to answer the doorbell from wherever we are. When Steve’s new GoPro Hero 5 was delivered while we were out of town, I was able to tell the delivery person to leave it and then ping my neighbor to go snag it from the front door so I wouldn’t have to buy a third one. Continue reading “Watch Bad Guys (and Coyotes) with the Ring Floodlight Cam”

First HomeKit-Compatible Security Camera: Omna 180Cam HD from D-Link

Omna in my handYou’ve heard me complain about the setup process for virtually every device from the Amazon Echo to the Hue Lightbulbs, but this time it’s another story. D-Link just started shipping the Omna 180 Cam HD, the very first HomeKit-compatible indoor security camera and it’s fabulous.

Steve has been wanting an indoor security camera for a long time, but he wouldn’t go with one that wasn’t HomeKit compatible for security reasons. When the Omna was announced, I pre-ordered it directly from Apple, with the plan to give it to him on his birthday in April.

But then I realized two things. A) I couldn’t wait to give it to him, and B) having this installed before we go on a 2 week vacation makes more sense. We have a TSA Agent who lives in our house while we’re gone, but for when she’s not around this would be really useful. The other thing that helped my decision to give it to him early was that it arrived more than a week early!

The Omna is really small. It’s only 2 inches in diameter and round 5 inches tall. It’s a silver cylinder with a fisheye lens about a quarter of the way down from the top. Before I tell you everything it does, let’s talk about what’s normally the annoying part, the setup. Continue reading “First HomeKit-Compatible Security Camera: Omna 180Cam HD from D-Link”

Open post
NosillaCast Logo

NC #612 Oticon Hearing Aid, ShadeCraft Sunflower, TiVo + Moca, Ring, Whoosh!

This weeks’ show features interviews from CES with Oticon about their connected hearing aid, ShadeCraft and their Sunflower autonomous robotic shade, Ring (the makers of the video doorbell) about their Floodlight Cam and their Stickup Cam, and Whoosh!, an anti-microbial screen treatment system. I’ll also tell you the tale of how Steve and I didn’t believe Chris Ashley and Dave Hamilton when they said buying all new TiVos would actually save us money.


itunes
mp3 download

Continue reading “NC #612 Oticon Hearing Aid, ShadeCraft Sunflower, TiVo + Moca, Ring, Whoosh!”

Cascable to Capture, View, and Edit RAW Photos from Your Big Girl Camera

Cascable logoIf you’ve got a relatively recent DSLR or Micro Four Thirds camera, you’ve probably got built-in WiFi. This feature is pretty cool. It allows you to connect your phone to the camera’s WiFi and then download the images. Maybe your manufacturer even lets you remotely control the camera. I’ve got the Olympus E-M10 and this feature has allowed me to capture better images and yet also post the pictures to social media nearly as quickly as those posting from their phones’ cameras.

As cool as this feature is, there are a couple of downsides. Most cameras (possibly all) will not let you view or transfer RAW photos. You either have to shoot RAW + JPG or you have to convert the images in-camera to JPG before getting to play with them. Some manufacturer’s software will let you view and download RAW images, but what you don’t realize is that it’s actually converting them to JPG before it does that. A recent update to the Olympus Share software now lets me view RAW images but I tested the download and it was a JPG upon arrival.

 Cascable ios image preview with exif data
Cascable iOS image preview with EXIF data

My E-M10 has a dedicated app and the remote control capabilities are pretty cool. I can change white balance, exposure and more. But there are a few things that I can’t do with it, notably have fine control over bracketed shooting, doing time-lapse photography and more.

Now that I’ve set the stage (or perhaps we could call it “the problem to be solved”), I’d like to tell you about an app called Cascable from cascable.se that might be a one-stop shopping app to download RAW photos, provide more advanced remote control of your camera and a lot more.

Continue reading “Cascable to Capture, View, and Edit RAW Photos from Your Big Girl Camera”

How Much Better is the iPhone 7 Plus Wide-Angle Camera Than the iPhone 6?

Busybee 2x 7+There’s a lot of reasons we use to justify how much money we spend on our technology. One of my personal favorites is how we justify new phones. “My contract is up”, “It’s been 2 years” and “It’s my turn” are amongst the more popular versions of this silliness.

Well, it’s my turn to get a new phone this year. Steve is on the s track and I’m on the non-s track for the iPhone. We pay full price for our iPhones now so there’s no logic whatsoever to this, but at least it keeps us from each buying a new phone we don’t need every year. I mentioned earlier that I decided it was time to upgrade to the big girl iPhone, so I opted for the iPhone 7 Plus. My decision was made easier by the new dual cameras. Continue reading “How Much Better is the iPhone 7 Plus Wide-Angle Camera Than the iPhone 6?”

Ricoh Theta S “360” Camera Review

Theta first photoSteve loves photography and videography, having a barrel of fun with his iPhone 6s and his GoPro Hero 3. The GoPro’s ultra wide angle lets him take selfies with a lot of people in the photo. One of his favorite photos (which has been Lindsay’s cover photo for ages) is one of his entire family, 22 of us, all in one shot. That’s really hard to get with any other kind of camera. He also gets phenomenal shots of scenery with his GoPro, often with the two of us in the close foreground. Landscape photography alone can be a bit boring and selfies alone get overdone, but a combination can be a nice change.

There’s only one thing cooler than an ultra wide photo from a GoPro, and that’s the new 360 degree photos and videos you can get with specialized cameras. Before we go too far, I want to acknowledge that “360 degree” isn’t technically correct, because in reality these photos are 4π steradians. Degrees (or radians) only describe one dimension, you need 4π steradians to describe all directions at once. But for the purpose of not sounding like the nerd ball I am, I will use the conventional 360 term. Know that it bugs me every time I say it though.

Alex Lindsay on MacBreak Weekly bought a 360 camera called the Ricoh Theta S and used it to take a photo of 30 of his relatives at his father’s 90th birthday party. He put the camera in the middle of the table and had everyone gather in a circle. It’s so cool! I knew that Steve would love one of these. Luckily Father’s day is coming up soon so I bought one for him early and couldn’t wait to give it to him. The Ricoh Theta S is $350 on Amazon right now, so think GoPro pricing.
Continue reading “Ricoh Theta S “360” Camera Review”

Posts navigation

1 2
Scroll to top